Quality Magazine

Stemmer Imaging and Kontron Sign Agreement for Custom Image Processing Projects

October 12, 2010

Kontron (Eching, Germany), a maker of embedded computing technology, and Stemmer Imaging (Puccheim, Germany), a provider of industrial image processing products and services, announced a cooperation contract to optimize the customization of hardware and software for image processing applications. The agreement is intended to help cost and time to market for large-scale, customer-specific image processing projects through single source supplying.

The cooperation between Stemmer Imaging and Kontron has given rise to application-ready image processing platforms that will be available from both organizations. The platforms are based on the configurable Kontron Industrial Silent Server KISS and are adapted to the individual requirements of industrial image processing. This allows optimal deployment of Common Vision Blox, Stemmer Imaging’s image processing software platform.

The emerging industrial image processing solutions focus on the identification and quality control of general and bulk cargo in manufacturing and packaging as well as the quality control of sheet goods such as woven items and plastic and metal sheeting. The certification standards of Kontron products ensure the platforms are particularly suited for use in intelligent traffic systems and medical technology applications.

Christof Zollitsch, Managing Director of Stemmer Imaging remarked: "Working with Kontron will allow us to increase the innovation available to our customers. This will enable us to considerably increase the speed and efficiency with which we implement large-scale industrial image processing projects, which always have a strong need for individualization when it comes to configuring hardware and software and the interaction between them."

Zollisch expects that the further optimization of Stemmer's image processing algorithms can take the overall quality of our applications to a higher level by tying algorithms even closer to the underlying hardware, which is based on the latest processor generations.